Skip to main content

About Idolatry

Talking with Christian, you can't avoid a pejorative term 'idolatry'.

But I don't think there is anything wrong to pray to an idol, because idol worshipers don't actually believe those images or statues made of mud, or carved from wood, or  chiseled out of stone are alive, those objects are just an image representing god or angels. That's why people choose a special day, on 1st and 15th of each month or birthday to go the temple, to light incense and make offer. On these days, Buddhas and other angels will come down from Heaven to listen to the prayers.

Idol worshipers actually acknowledge one Supreme God above those gods, such as Chinese,  once a year they sent their kitchen god to Heaven, the kitchen god acts as a medium between human being and the Highest God, he report good deed or wrongdoings of every household.

We may ask if you have some difficulties or unjust done to you, will you go straight to Prime Minister, or first to your local councilor? In the past, sacrifice to Shangdi or the supreme God is the privilege of Emperor , he acted as the Highest Priest, all other people in the empire are forbidden to sacrifice to Shangdi or Great Mountain and River.

Christians tell me there are millions of angels, do they all have names? But Chinese know those angels' name, ignorant of the name of Shangdi, we simple call Him Shangdi, means Supreme God, or just call Him by where He presides, which is Heaven. Angels are closer to our daily lives, and meet better to our needs.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Panic or panick

There is only one spelling for panic ; the verb is inflected 'panic, panics, panicked, and panicking’. The form panick is used for progressive tense, past tense and past participle. We don't write panick today, though English speakers from a few hundred years ago might have (in the same way they might have written musick). When the alternate spelling “panick” is used for the past participle: "I panicked last night at the disco." When it’s use for progressive tense: “Invariably, when markets are panicking, they sell the stocks quickly.” It's the rule for root words ending in "c" is that you have to add “k”, so the spelling is related with the pronunciation. If we don't add the <k>, it looks as if the <c> has to be pronounced /s/. If the "k" was not there, “panicing” would look like the word which is supposed to be pronounced as if it is ended in "sing," while “paniced” would be pronounced like “panised”. The same

Does pearls reproduce by itself through time

At the request of several families he and Mrs Legge gave a home for some months to a young Dutch girl, a granddaughter of the first Dutch governor of the Straits Settlements. She had several pearls of which the Dutch residents were great collectors, got from oysters found in a river of the Malay Peninsula, when she left them she gave Mrs Legge a small box containing a large pearl the size of a pea, with a blue spot on it, and two others not so large. This box was then put away and locked up. Several weeks later he took it out and on opening it discovered more than a dozen pearls, most of them very small. Astonished at the phenomenon he called his chief servant, a Portuguese, who happened to enter the room and who expressed no surprise but declared it to be a common occurrence. On enquiry he found that many of the Dutch people had jars of pearls, large and small, which had accumulated in this way. Some years later he related the incident at dinner on board ship. The captain was a cautio

Sans Foy, Sans Joy and Sans Loy

Sans: without The origin of sans was Old French sanz, from a variant of Latin sine 'without', influenced by Latin absentia 'in the absence of'. Sans Serif, a typeface without short line at the top or bottom of a letter. In the long poem 'The Faerie Queene' by Edmund Spenser, three dark knights  called Sans Foy, Sans Joy and Sans Loy, meaning "Faithless", "Joyless" and "Lawless",  they fought Red Cross Knight Sir George, they are brothers. sans-culotte, literally 'without knee breeches', was a lower-class Parisian republican in the French Revolution. an extreme republican or revolutionary.