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How to ask people to brainstorm for you?

Whenever you ask people to brainstorm for you, I can guarantee that you get many crazy ideas as "pie in the sky."

If you are faced with a very creative opportunity, it's easy to let the enthusiasm get the better of you, of course, it should be easier for you to spot the ideas that are impossible or just too much work. Be gentle with your collaborators and try to bring them down to earth without too much of a bump. If you reject all their ideas before they finish their sentence, they'll quickly stop continuing! Explain how the same idea might be turned into something more feasible, and don't dismiss any ideas until you've finished the brainstorming process. It's worth keeping everyone brainstorming, as it's often the case that people who have the craziest idea eventually come up with brilliant idea that no one else would thought of.
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