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Denial-of-Service Attacks

One of the popular methods of denial-of-service (DoS) attacks on a database server in a peer-to-pper network is by creating a 'UDP packet storm' on the server. The effect is an attack on one host causes that host to perform poorly.

(When it comes to moving all that information across the Internet there is not only one choice when it comes to transport protocols. There are two. Namely, TCP and UDP. In this article we will look at the User Datagram Protocol, aka UDP. Don Parker)

An attack between two hosts can cause extreme network congestion in addition to adversely affecting host performance. When a connection is established between two UDP service, each of which produces a very high number of packets. This causes packet flooding leading to a denial of service on the machines where the services are offered.

Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is another form of threat to database security in a peer-to-peer network. These attacks involve breaking into thousands of computers in a peer-to-peer network by following a few coordinated steps, taking control over those computers by installing 'root-kit' programs that take over system administrator privileges to keep other administrative users from being able to fnd the intruder. DDoS attacks are primarily targeted at shared computing resources such as database servers, Web servers, network bandwidth, router processing capability, and so forth.

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