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Banns

The procedure for marriages in the Church of England is slightly different from civil method.

The traditional method used by most couples is the publication of banns. The banns are published by being read aloud during the service on each of the three Sundays before the ceremony. You do not have to be a member of the church to be married there but it is usual for the couple to attend the church on at least one of the three occasions when the banns are read.

You can get more details from either a religious minister who is authorised to conduct marriages or the local registrar of marriages.

This marriage banns from "Isle of Wight Family Trees", Banns of marriage between William Dashwood and Mary Ann Harden Widow October 1857

It looks so simple, a ready-printed receipt, the minister only needed to fill in the name and date. Then read aloud during the Sunday service.

This is the banns of same-sex marriage, reading out at at the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto on Dec. 10, 2000. This seemed a great event in the legalization process of the same sex marriage.

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