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Frost won't start on Ubuntu

This problem identified in the support mailing list has not been solved for Ubuntu users,  this happens at "Initializing Mainframe" with about 20% of the progress bar and then stops progressing.

If you check the log file, you find something wrong with the Java Internationalization (i18n) resources file, the error message says "SEVERE: Resource not found in jar file: /i18n/langres_gb.properties".

The most likely solution is to install Sun Java suggested by Volodya, because Ubuntu uses GNU Java instead of Sun Java. Click Open Ubuntu Software center, search for Sun Java, then install JRE, probably you need to install add-ons too, click more information, and check all add-ons if you don't know which one to choose.

After this, I get Frost up and running, but there are still some problems, I can't add active board list by importing XML file. It show successfully imported but the boards won't appear in the left pane.

It seems that Frost is not so popular, I intended to connect with human rights activists, but I find no dissidents, terrorists, or drug dealers, many die hard pornographers sharing their memories though.

Comments

  1. Brilliant post! Thanks for sharing this article. It widens my knowledge regarding frost and ubuntu.

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