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Early Literacy : A Guide for Parents

A major part of our work with children is developing Early Literacy skills. One of the most significant steps in learning to read is a gradual understanding that the visual aspects of print, that is the individual letters and groups of letters correspond to the sounds we hear in speaking.

In Nursery as well as at home, we can help children in this process by:


  • reciting and singing Nursery Rhymes
  • using rhymes of all kinds to make sounds fun
  • encouraging the children to dress up and act out their favourite rhymes and stories
  • drawing the children attention to words that start/end with the same letters and sounds
Number rhymes are also good fun and help children to remember the order of numbers


You are also:


  • Using lots of plastic, magnetic and sponge letters as well as alphabet puzzles, wall friezes and alphabet books to encourage the children to learn the names and sounds of letters
  • encouraging the children to recognise his/her own name and its letters
  • drawing attention to the many labels and signs in the environment


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