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Some Acronym for my Mobile Phone

A mobile network is also called a cellular network because the network is distributed over land areas called cells, each served by at least one fixed-location transceiver, known as a cell site or base station.

GPRS is short for General Packet Radio Service, it's a mobile data service on the 2G and 3G cellular communication system, GPRS usage is typically charged based on volume of data transferred, contrasting with circuit switched data, which is usually billed per minute of connection time. So that you see on your mobile phone bill, the former is measured by Megabytes, but the later by Minutes.

GPS and GPRS

GPS is a positioning service that can determine any location on earth, hence the name Global Positioning System. On the other hand, GPRS is a data service technology that enables 2G telecommunication networks to provide services other than voice calls.

2G, 3G, 4G

2G is short for ‘2nd Generation wireless telephone technology’. 2G lets you send text and picture messages and has some internet capabilities. A letter E or G  means that your phone is currently using 2G speeds.

The ‘G’ stands for GPRS, which gives you slow, dial up modem speeds when you're trying to use data or the Internet. The ‘E’ stands for 'enhanced', and your Internet will work a little faster than when it's on G.

Similarly, 3G is short for 3rd Generation, it allows video calls and provides faster internet. Either ‘3G’, ‘H’ or ‘H+’ to show that you're on 3G.

4G is short for th 4th Generation. 4G internet speeds are five times faster than 3G, but currently you need a 4G compatible phone and you need to live in an area with 4G phone signal.

NFC stands for Near Field Communication, which allows Beam sharing data between two mobile phones.

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