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Wolf Island

I am reading Darren Shan's wolf Island (Demonata 8 ).

Darren Shan is number one master of horror. Darren shan is also the author of the phenomentally successful twelve book series The saga of Darrren Shan. His adventures have been read by millions of people around the world in several different languages, yet much of his life remains shrouded in mystery. He lives in seclusion in the depths of Ireland. and he never drinks blood. Or so he claims.

Trespassers will be eaten....

"We spot the werewolves as we skim the treetops. Mutated, vicious, hairy monstrosities, all fangs, claws and muscles. The beast within me tries to force its way to the surface, howling silently at its warped brethren. I've never rid myself of the wolf....

As the mysterious Shadow builds an army of demons, Grubbs and his team search desperately for answers. But when they follow up a new lead, it leads them to an old unexpected foe - the Lambs.

The curse of the Gradys has returned with a vengeance. Werewolves are on the loose. and they're hungry...

wolf-island

Darren Shan's great books have been translated and publish in Taiwan, but I don't know in mainland.

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