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About Shaman

A Shaman can make his spirit jump into another body, into a bear or a wild boar, or a hawk, etc. He can share the creature'd power.
Sometimes a family has a shaman for a son or daughter. That brings trouble for them. The shaman moves among us in times of trouble. He journeys with his power creature and brings back life for everyone. Whe he dies, he leaves his voice in the mountains to guide the next shaman.

--Caroline Pitcher: the Shaman Boy, p. 225-226

Shamans are not alway good.  As with shaman cloak.  Some cloaks full of powers of malevolence, old magic, superstition, ill-will, hurt and harm. Whoever wears the cloak will shift his spirit, through the air, water and fire, over the earth and under it too. He will bring fear to his people. He will hold live coals in his hands, suck souls out of ears, spit palgue, cough gold and banish those we do not want.

-- Same as before, p.339

But Luka said, The cloak itself isn't wicked. It's just what people believe it can do. They make it like that and give it power.

p.342

A Shanman

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