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Roles in a Boarding School

In the 18th century the question might not be "which school?", but "school or private tutor?".

Rich people sent their boys to a Public School,  or Boarding School, under the cares of different personals of a Boarding school, which include:

Headmaster would be hightly recommended particularly for the art of whipping little boys, parents in 19th century thought, in terms of education, there was nothing to be done without corporal punishment.

Sometimes, mothers felt such a wrench to send their children away, so towards the end of the 19th century the position of Matron in boarding schools had become established, and mothers could feel that there was, in effect, a mother substitute to look after their children.

House Masters,  scholars lived in different boarding house, and every house has its master and assistant house master. Some pupils might live in almost as a member of his tutor's family, those were called parlour boarder, so their tutor were also their House Master.

In traditional English Schooling, every acadamic year was called a form, pupils started their first year of schooling in the first form, second year second form, and so on. This tradition has been kept unchanged until 1990-1991 acadmic year. In old boarding school, every form has its Form Master, young scholars were also under the supervisions of  the Form Master.

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