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How to describe a photograph

The photograph was of excellent quality having good definition and clarity for an image dating back to the late 19th Century.

Seated was a girl of about 22. If not beautiful, certainly very attractive wearing a dress decorated with a good calibre embroidered lace. A small book lay lightly in her hands, but she was looking directly at the camera. An ornate cross, appended to a chain hung round her neck, and hinted at religious devotion.

This was not a vain girl.  She had a short simple hair style, parted on the left. Her teeth were slightly prominent. something familiar about the way she held herself - inclined a touch to the right and head tilted slightly to the left.

This compelling maiden drew me to study those agreeable pleasant round eyes. It was with wonderment and amazement, that it began to dawn on me why this particular contenance should be familiar.

 

[caption id="attachment_315" align="alignnone" width="204" caption="Miss Florence Calder"]Mrs Florence Calder[/caption]

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