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Heating

In Charles Dickens' novel A Christmas Carol, Scrooge is a miser, see how he kept the smallest coal fire to save heating bills:
Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was very much smaller that it looked like one coal. but he couldn't replenish it, for Scrooge kept the coal-box in his own room; and so surely as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part. Wherefore the clerk put on his white comforter, and tried to warm himself at the candle; in which effort, not being a man of as strong imagination, he failed.
Eunice says, her colleague stays two hours longer in office instead of going home after working. Even at weekend, he goes to his office to save energy bill for heating. He share a house with other three house mates, I wonder how they divide their cost.

Eunice seems to carry on a Guerrilla warfare with me on gas heating, or a tug of war, or a seesaw of war whatever. She always turns down the gas heater to the smallest whenever possible, then I have to reset to higher gas mark.

They say, it's burning money. In China, we wear more clothes during coldest day, jumpers, coats, two trousers, thick socks. Because the weather in middle China is not cold enough to economically install heating system, but the house is not optimized for keeping heat inside , so there are indeed several cold days during winter.

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