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Overweight British Kings and Queens

King Henry VIII hate greens, seemed never to eat vegetables and fruits. He was tall and  handsomen with a bright red-gold cap of hair and beard in his youth,  and he was very athletic, he loved hunting and party.  But he became grossly overweight and ill in his later years,  The fat, balding and unhealthy man has been often remembered.

William the Bastard, the Duke of Normandy, known as William the Conqueror was crowned on Christmas Day 1066 as the King of England.  He had become very overweight in his later life and when they tried to get his body into  his stone tomb at Caen, it burst. A foul stench leaked out into the church and into the nostrils of those who had come to pay their respects.

George the Fourth  was infamous for being overweight, overdressed, and oversexed and one of the most controversial an outrageous monarchs in British.  He wore horrible greasy make-up on his face and was so fat it was said that his stomach hung down to his knees.  He stay in bed all day where he was served huge meals.

Victoria was a little fat English Queen, her height was under five feet, but her width was around five feet! She might look like a ball when she was in a huge skirts, and no wonder that huge skirts was  the fashion for Victorian women. They worn layers of petticoats under the skirts, and used crinolines (hoops of bamboo, whalebone or steel which fastened to the wearer's waist) to support as the skirts got wider and bigger.

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